Law calls for job ad details

| 19/05/2009

(CNS): Due to new requirements in the immigration law which come into effect on 1 June employers will need to indicate the salary range and benefits offered for posts where they are seeking work permits. Advertisements for positions accompanying work permit applications to the Immigration Department and must include information on salary range, benefits and other relevant information. Chief Immigration Officer Franz Manderson said that this measure is now a legal requirement under the immigration law.

Manderson noted that after 1 June applications submitted to the department, the Work Permit and Business Staffing Plan boards, without this specified information will not be accepted. He also said that the advertisements must also indicate the newspaper in which it was published along with the publication date.

He explained that the requirements exist to equip the department and the boards with the information needed to decide each application for a work permit on its merit, which ultimately helps to protect Caymanians in the workplace.

According to  Section (4) of the Immigration Regulations (2007 Revision) as amended among other provisions employers making work permit applications and renewals must be accompanied by, “a copy of each advertisement published in accordance with sub-regulation (3), with details of the newspaper in which it was published and such advertisement shall contain information relating to salary range and all other benefits attaching to the advertised post and the date on which it was published; a full and accurate description of the job to be filled; a full and accurate description of the qualifications the employer or prospective employer considers necessary for carrying out the job and the reasons for requiring those qualifications.”  

Employers are also obligated to submit the details of any responses received from the advertisements including the qualifications of those who responded; and the reasons for not employing any Caymanian, or persons legally resident in the Islands, who responded.

Category: Business

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