NDC calls for community support of campaign

| 23/06/2011

(CNS): The National Drug Council (NDC) is encouraging the whole community to get involved in helping to inspire everyone to act against drug misuse. This Sunday the NDC will mark the United Nations’ International Day against Drug Abuse and Illicit Trafficking to raise awareness about the major challenge that drugs represent to society as a whole, and especially to the young. “Preventing or delaying use of psychoactive drugs, alcohol, and tobacco among adolescents is a critical national public health goal. The simplest and most cost-effective way to lower the human and societal costs of drug abuse is to prevent it in the first place”, said Joan West-Dacres Executive Director of the NDC.

This years’ theme is “Your life. Your community. No Place for Drugs”.

The NDC is calling on individuals, non-profit organisations, government and the private sector to get involved by organising office events, spreading the word through networks and contacts and using the campaign slogan and logo in promotional products, websites and social media.

More than 50% of students in the Cayman Islands do not use illegal drugs (CISDUS 2010). Many people who once used illegal drugs have now rejected them; many suffered as a result of drug abuse. Accidents, addiction, criminal involvement, damaged relationships, impaired judgment, and lost educational or employment opportunities were common. Of those people who currently use illegal drugs, some are chronic abusers. Preventing Cayman's 6000 plus children from using drugs, alcohol, and tobacco will help safeguard our society, the NDC said.

“Preventing drug abuse is one of the best investments we can make in our country's future”, stated Simon Miller, Prevention Officer. Doing so is preferable to dealing with the consequences of drug abuse through law enforcement or drug treatment. “Prevention is most promising when it is directed at impressionable youngsters.”

Adolescents are most susceptible to the allure of illicit drugs. Delaying or preventing the first use of illegal drugs, alcohol, and tobacco is essential. Prevention programmes are not vaccinations that inoculate children against substance abuse. Sadly, significant numbers of young people who participate in the best programmes will go on to use drugs. The "no-use" message must be reinforced consistently by parents, teachers, coaches, mentors, and other care givers.

The National Drug Council‘s scientific research continues to play a major role in informing many local bodies on issues of substance abuse misuse through its Cayman Islands Student Drug Use Survey (CISDUS).

The UNDCO’s 2011 campaign seeks to mobilise support and inspire people to act against drug use. Therefore, the National Drug Council encourages everyone to spread the message “No Place for Drugs”.

According to the latest UN drug report published Thursday many illicit drug markets have reached global dimensions. While global markets for cocaine, heroin and cannabis have declined or remained stable, the production and abuse of prescription opioid drugs and new synthetic drugs is rising the World Drug report reveals. Globally, some 210 million people, or 4.8% of the population aged 15-64, took illicit substances at least once in the previous year. Overall drug use, including problem drug use,  remains stable but demand soared for substances not under international control, such as piperazine and cathinone. The effects of cannabis are also being mimicked by synthetic cannabinoids, or "spice".

Cannabis remains by far the most widely produced and consumed illicit substance globally, although data on cannabis are limited. In 2009, between 2.8 per cent and 4.5 per cent of the world population aged 15-64 – between 125 and 203 million people – had used cannabis at least once in the past year.

While cannabis herb (marijuana) production is widespread, notably in the Americas and Africa, cannabis resin production (hashish) continues to be concentratedin just two countries: Morocco, supplying the West European and North African markets, and Afghanistan supplying the markets in South-West Asia.

For information on the local call NDC on 949-9000, Fax. 949-6264, email: info@ndc.ky or visit www.ndc.ky

See Global drug report here
 

Category: Health

Comments (4)

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  1. Anonymous says:

    Allow me to "enlighten"
    Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on Fri, 06/24/2011 – 08:41.

    Allow me to "enlighten" everybody. Yes, some "drugs" are bad. Like Cocaine, Crack Cocaine, Herion, Meth, prescription painkillers, ALCOHOL; yes, alcohol which has taken the lives of countless numbers of men women and children……Why is marijuana still illegal? when it could easily be taxed. and oh. the police can stop arresting people with the most minute bit of ganja and focus on the real robbers, big drug lords, rapists…..but still they are so quick to jump on the ganja. People of this generation need to step up to the plate and realise whats right before they try to rule a nation. Marijuana has killed not a single soul (none that are properly reported) and I'd like to see an alcohol death ratio to marijuana related death chart, just to prove my point. Another post on this news website states they would like to have overseas prison to keep all the real convicts. so now what? are we going to fill the jails with innocent people now, or our we going to focus on what the real problem is here.

     

    In conclusion to the post above mine I think marijuana should remain illegal. Yes, we can say it is not as harmful as other substances..but how many crimes are commited under the influence of a substance? We know alcohol and other substances are major problem with crimminal activity. You ask why are you arresting people with smaller charges such as a marijuana charge..I would assume they arrest them to find the connection of where they got the substance in the first place. I agree the jail would have more room if they werent to carry on a sentence time. My thought is if your going to arrest them and they do their time or get released how you going to fix the problem so it wont happen again?? If marijuana was made legal how many other problems would we have? We know we would have a higher increase of the youth usingthe substance. Younger youth have ahigher risk of developing a mental illness after long use such as schizophrenia . We know that smoking leads to memory problems and learning difficulties. How are we going to except these youth to do better if they cant remember things properly or function proper? Not just from the use but from the withdrawls when they dont have it. We know that marijuana use leads to more chest illnesses and other diseases which will cause a increase in health care. Im not seeing anything positive about having it legal, except a decrease of inmates in jail.

  2. Anonymous says:

    Just say No! – Instant deportation for people caught with 2 lbs of drugs and not Caymanian Status. Kick them out! Drug dealers. 

  3. Anonymous says:

    Allow me to "enlighten" everybody. Yes, some "drugs" are bad. Like Cocaine, Crack Cocaine, Herion, Meth, prescription painkillers, ALCOHOL; yes, alcohol which has taken the lives of countless numbers of men women and children……Why is marijuana still illegal? when it could easily be taxed. and oh. the police can stop arresting people with the most minute bit of ganja and focus on the real robbers, big drug lords, rapists…..but still they are so quick to jump on the ganja. People of this generation need to step up to the plate and realise whats right before they try to rule a nation. Marijuana has killed not a single soul (none that are properly reported) and I'd like to see an alcohol death ratio to marijuana related death chart, just to prove my point. Another post on this news website states they would like to have overseas prison to keep all the real convicts. so now what? are we going to fill the jails with innocent people now, or our we going to focus on what the real problem is here.

  4. Nancy Raygan says:

    People will do drugs because people like drugs.  Prohibition and the "war on drugs" have only created a massive source of revenue for criminals.  Legalisation and taxation will do more to reduce the societal costs of drugs than anything else.