PR answer “too simple”

| 06/11/2011

(CNS): The chair of the immigration review team has said that the opposition proposal to abolish rollover completely and make the permanent residency application the point where people are rolled out of Cayman is too simple. Sherri Bodden-Cowan said government opted to suspend the rollover policy rather than abolish it completely to provide time to examine what would be the most effective way of managing the complex problems of immigration in the interests of the local population and business.  She said that the Opposition Leader Alden McLaughlin’s idea of allowing as many as 20,000 people to apply for PR was not the right solution to the complex problem.

McLaughlin recently began advocating for a complete abolition of the rollover policy and to replace it with a more transparent PR application process, making that the point where the decisions over who should stay and go would be made and that it should not reserved only for the “rich and famous”. 

Speaking on Thursday evening at the Generation Now discussion on the country’s seven year term limit for work permit holders, known as the rollover policy, Bodden-Cowan said the opposition leader’s position was far too simple given the complexities of the country’s labour and immigration issues.

The immigration expert, and one of the architects of the original policy, said the point of suspending rollover was to look at the evidence and the statistics on how the policy had affected Caymanians as well as the business community and to gather public input.

“It is extremely complex and it affects everyone,” she added, pointing out that there was a need to examine occupations and industries and do a better job understanding what positions and career choices Caymanians are interested in. “It is not as simple as allowing 20,000 people to apply at year eight.”

Bodden-Cowan promised that by the time the review of rollover was finished, the committee would have a well reasoned and well thought out position and would be able to recommend to government what the policy should be replaced with. She said no one should be under theimpression that the country could abolish rollover completely. Criticising McLaughlin for over simplifying the issue, she pointed out that he was still advocating to roll people out.

The opposition leader said Thursday that it was as simple as he was suggesting and that the government has opted to make things unnecessarily complicated. He noted that not all 20,000 work permit holders would be applying for PR as not all of them would stay. But, he said, whoever reached year eight should have the chance to apply.

He stated that the problem with rollover was it had become increasingly unequal. While most business sectors battled with the problem of losing staff, the financial services had become unofficially exempt. “No one is advocating that the financial service sector is not critically important but you still can’t adopt the approach that because a person works in the industry they can automatically stay,” McLaughlin added.

By doing away with what was now a discriminatory practice, he said, everyone who stayed long enough should be allowed to make an application to permanently reside here and that’s where the decision over who stays and who goes could be made fairly and transparently.

Not everyone would get through, but with a transparent system everyone would know what was expected of them in order to score enough points to stay, creating a much fairer and simpler system. He pointed out that recent legislation had already exempted caregivers from rollover, allowing them to go on to apply for PR, so he questioned why everyone who stayed long enough could not be given the same equal opportunity.

“Not everyone will get through,” McLaughlin said, “but permanent residency should not just be for the rich and famous.”

The opposition leader said government’s move to suspend rather than abolish rollover had created further complications and uncertainties and he asked what would happen to the people that are now being given a term limit extension once the two years was over. “This is government by crisis and not the way we should be running things,” McLaughlin added.

Category: Politics

Comments (76)

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  1. Paper Caymanian says:

    Cho-man, why unno posts so long? Some of you have sound and informative information. However, they are just too long to read. Please abridge your post so that I can read it and enjoy it.

  2. Anonymous says:

    Go Sherry!!!!! I know you of all people will see to it that a proper system is put in place that will ensure that qualified Caymanians with professional degrees, certifications, experience and accomplishments will be considered fairly in the job market, regardless of their competition's Birth Certificate, and vice, versa!!!   

    • Tiny Briefs says:

      I can only assume "Go Sherry" refers to what this poster drinks for breakfast.  There is no other logical explanation for what followed.  Aside from vodka.

    • Anonymous says:

      Oh pulllleeeeze.  U been drinkin waaaaayy too much Sherry.

  3. Anonymous says:

    After almost a year of planning and researching Cayman and just about ready to arrive, I am having some SERIOUS second thoughts as to whether I should reconsider the acceptance of the position offered to me and become an "expat", thus uprooting my husband and two small children. Sounds as if we would not be welcome…

    And I am very concerned about the constant negative comments directed at certain groups from other caribbean islands…shame on you all! It is disgusting to read!

    Is Cayman really that hateful???

    I understand the reasoning behind some of the changes that immigration must go through in order to keep a solid workforce in Cayman and protect the rights of Caymanians. We are not considered wealthy as a family by any means, but we do intend to immerse ourselves entirely within the Caymanian community and that includes contributing socially, financially and otherwise. We are certainly "no burden" to Cayman.

    Perhaps a better line of thinking would be to evaluate what "kind" of immigrant Cayman really wants, if any at all…

    If you want wealthy property owners, then just say so. If you want to eject all those from certain regions in the Caribbean, then do so…just make up your minds.

    And stop being so racist…it hurts my heart.

    • Anonymous says:

      I think your post is unfair. There are many more negative posts against Caymanians here than by them against others. The frequent implication of many expat posts is that Caymanians are lazy, incompetent, poorly educated, hypocritical, xenophobic and entitlement-minded. The funny thing is that you don't condemn these attitudes (I guess you simply assume that they are correct in their assessment) but instead, even before you have arrived, you have branded us as "racists". If you come with a negative mindset you will surely create your own reality.

      "…constant negative comments directed at certain groups from other caribbean islands".

      I don't know what "certain groups" you are referring to or what "other Caribbean islands" you mean. If you are referring to the back and forth between Jamaicans and Caymanians you will find that there is a long history between us and the negative comments go both ways. The truth is that Jamaicans are the closest to us culturally (we love their food and their music), there is a great deal of affinity between us and we would really miss Jamaicans if they were not here. Especially me – my wife is one.

      But, like family does, we squabble from time to time. I don't see any basis for the conclusion that we "want to eject all those from certain regions in the Caribbean".  There is also no reason to conclude that we don't want any immigrants. The point of the debate on rollover is exactly to determine who we want as permanent members of our society. Presently the UDP is indicating that it wants the wealthy executive/property owner types, while the PPM says that it should not only be for the famous and wealthy but should include some ordinary folk who make meaningful contributions to our community. Its sounds as if you would fit into the latter category. However, neither party is saying that you are not welcome to come to work unless you would ultimately qualify as a permanent resident.

      I have not seen one post suggesting that there should be no immigrants or that expats are not welcome. However, you need to appreciate that expats gaining permanent rights is a very delicate issue in a small community which is outnumbered by expats. Were the relative ratios of natives to expats applied in any other community there would not just be some negative posts on a news website there would be full on violent confrontations. In the 1960s when there was significant immigration from the Caribbean to Britain (but insignificant compared to the proportion of expats here) there were riots. Polticians were making speeches about "rivers of blood" happening if immigration was not brought to a halt.

      I would ask you to be a little more balanced in your assessment, keep an open mind, respect the sensitivities involved and not simply write us off as a nation of racists before you have had a chance to meet us.            

             

  4. Anonymous says:

    Aldens solution seems straightforward. I dont see why it wouldn't work. Problem here is we overcomplicate things to the point of mass confusion.

  5. Anonymous says:

    There are no simple solutions or quick fixes here and that is the first matter to get in touch with.  The reality is Cayman is small.  McKeeva screwed us all to the wall when he insanely granted status to thousands of people who in turn got status for spouses and dependants which multiplied those numbers exponentially.  These included criminals and others who in my opinion are undesirables in any civilised territory.  Now we are paying a heavy price in many ways and good people are suffering with the bad. 

    I believe that those who got statusby those illegal means should be reviewed first and if there are any blemishes on record for them they should be deported.  When I got status by the lawful and legal means including having to post my picture in the papers for two weeks and paying my fee, I was advised in Black and White that I had to maintain myself in legal and moral good standing otherwise my status would be revoked and I would be deported and I am a generational Caymanian who happened to be born abroad due to medical complications during my mother's pregnancy and the doctors feared we would both die if she delivered here.  I returned "home" at 3 weeks and have been here ever since but at the age of 32 I was required to obtain "Caymanian Status" and then was refused the right to  vote until I proved I had been voting since I was 18 years old. 

    The fact is there are and have been many flaws in this system and they have been blatantly overlooked or swept under the carpet to protect and benefit special interest persons or groups.  There should be a guideline set for those who wish to apply for citizenship of these islands but it should be done as it was before on an individual basis, no matter how long it takes and not across the board.  This is not the answer.  It should also be specified that your opportunity to work here for a year or 10 years does not give a person the right to obtain citizenship and at the end of your tenure or whenever you leave employment you must leave and cannot return to work for a period of at least 10 years. 

    This island is too small for the wonton distribution of citizenship simply because of longevity of tenure, wealth etc. and the focus should not be solely on wealth and or  tenure as it seems to be now.  Until recently there was only a very narrrow margin that separated the wealthy from the middle class and the middle calss from the lower income residents of these islands.  Now the divide has widened to where middle income is non existant because they are now poor compared to the wealthy here so there is only welathy and poor. 

    Suffice it to say that Caymanians are being ethnically cleansed by the importation of the wealthy or those who are imported and put in positions to become wealthy and then buy citizenship and control thses islands as they are doing now.  The bottom line here is that school teachers, mothers who make costumes each year for the school children, nurses, caregivers, garbage collectors, plumbers, dishwashers, beach cleaners and many lower income and even non working persons, and especially persons with blood connections to these islands should be the first to be considered for PR and Status.  These are the people that make up the framework of Cayman society and make valuable contributions instead of parading around Camana Bay or becoming Lion's or Rotarians just to have that on their PR application. 

    I will gladly sit on a board for free or assist Immigration with a review to ensure we do not have more school leavers with no jobs whose only home and chance to make a living is here.  I would also volunteer to be on a review team to review the PR's to see which ones are up to date on fees and whether or not they are residing here or simply earning an income here and living abroad….I know at least one who has not paid fees, but earns an income here and is in breach of at least 3 court orders, including those to support his children he abandoned here, however he has been permitted to come and go at will without any penalty. 

    Before we do anything else to change the Immig policies we need to collect the outstanding fees owed from PR, Right to be Employed etc. deport those who are not residing here and clean out the undesirables with Police Records and possibly make room for those who really do deserve to become Caymanian.

    • Anonymous says:

      "There are no simple solutions or quick fixes here and that is the first matter to get in touch with.  The reality is Cayman is small.  McKeeva screwed us all to the wall when he insanely granted status to thousands of people who in turn got status for spouses and dependants which multiplied those numbers exponentially.  These included criminals and others who in my opinion are undesirables in any civilised territory.  Now we are paying a heavy price in many ways and good people are suffering with the bad. …….

      ……Before we do anything else to change the Immig policies we need to collect the outstanding fees owed from PR, Right to be Employed etc. deport those who are not residing here and clean out the undesirables with Police Records and possibly make room for those who really do deserve to become Caymanian"

      I didn't want to post your entire comment because of it's length, but I did want to say, that it is the first sensible posting written in a very long time and very eloquently too.

      Every application for PR has to reviewed on a case by case basis.  All those of less than desirable character should be deported immediately.  Others that are taking an income but not actullay living here, need to be weeded out.  Absolutely anyone with a police record and criminal conviction should be made to leave, no if's, but's or maybe's.

      I am an Ex-Pat, living here on my own, working, paying my bills, taking nothing from the country, giving back as much as I can when I can and living honestly.  I would love to stay permanently, but realise that that's unlikely, because of the points systems.  I really do hope that something along the lines you note transpries and gives someone like me the opportunity to remain here without having to jump through hoops.

       

  6. Anonymous says:

    @10:11, "What do those Caymanians with free British Passports do to help the UK community?"

     

    We did it already. We saved royal blood and we are forever more rewarded by King George III from conscription or taxes for being so nice. By the way, you're welcome!

     

     

    • JimBob says:

      Please! If thats your claim to fame to heaven help us all. 

    • Oops there it is. . . says:

      Shame the ship was lured to the rocks by a wrecker in the first place. An early example of Cayman Kind.

  7. Anonymous says:

    @08:32, you said

    "Why not give in to reality and accept that all EU passport holders have the same automatic right to reside and work in the Cayman Islands without work permits or visas as a Caymanian on a British passport has to reside, work, claim welfare benefits, get free medical care, vote, etc. in the UK and all other EU countries.
    European Law states, 'Every citizen of the Union has the freedom to seek employment, to work, to exercise the right of establishment and to provide services in any Member State.'
    That ensures the right of Caymanians on British passports to come over here so it's only a matter of time before someone decides it has to be a two-way street and the courts back them up."
     

    The courts won't back them up as long as the BOTA (British Overseas Territories Act 2002) says that while citizens of the Overseas Territories can now apply for full British citizenship (and therefore gain right of abode in the UK by virtue of being a British citizen), British citizens visiting Overseas Territories are SUBJECT TO LOCAL IMMIGRATION CONTROLS.

     

    The current poplulation clocks tell the whole story.

    http://www.census.gov/population/www/popclockus.html

     

    With the current Caymanian population at around 60,000, the UK population around 62 million, the US over 312 million and the EU over 502 million, it is unreasonable to think that the Cayman Islands Government or the Caymanian people will agree to change existing laws to allow non-Caymanians, be they EU citizens or otherwise, the ability to work and reside here without work permits or visas.

     

    We only have 76 square miles in Grand Cayman, 100 total for the Cayman Islands…you think under your argument that small OT's could handle the influx of billions of people? The law is correct to take into consideration the enormous disparity in populations between the EU, the US, the UK and the OT's, and this protection is precisely the reason behind the BOTA specifically incorporating the provision to leave local immigration controls in the hands of the local jurisdictions instead of mandating them in the UK's parliament.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Demographics_of_the_European_Union

  8. Anonymous says:

    Is it fair to force a single parent of a Caymanian child to choose between that child knowing their father and paying EXHORBITANT permanent residency fees? My fee was $2400 per year and is now $8000! I am left with no choice but to leave,. It is economic blackmail, and sick to the nth degree, Govt. should be ashamed of themselves. $8000? WTF if that isn’t a violation of human rights it should be. I hope they all choke on their first class, paid by my kids future, on the back of their people, caviar meal.

    • FTP says:

      Permanent residency fees are illegal.  Here is how to avoid them:

      1) Ask the FS to exercise his discretion to waive the fee as not doing so would be interference with your right of family life, privacy and freedom from discrimination under the ECHR.

      2) On any decent advice he would know that he basically has to waive the fee, but if he does not then judicially review the decision.

      3) The judges willl correct him.

  9. Anonymous says:

    Why not give the people what they really want and shoot all the expats?

     

  10. D. Ebanks says:

    Britain is a large country. The Cayman Islands is a speck on the map. Because of this, it is easier for Cayman's culture to experience a shock by overpopulation than it is for Britain. Hence, Cayman needs tighter immigration policies. You cannot compare Cayman to Great Britain. That is not a fair comparison. If you can't value our culture, our people, our sons and daughters, then don't come here. Stay in Britain.

  11. Anonymous says:

    Any idea of how many Caymanians left in the last 5 years because they could find no work? How about giving them some confidence to return HOME !!

  12. Johnny Furreigner says:

    Has no-one pointed out that the ex-pats are all leaving?

    • Anonymous says:

      I have repeatedly noted that many expats in government are not having their contracts renewed.  Ethnic cleansing in the civil service.

      • Polly Tricks says:

        What?  They are slaughtering the non-Cyamanian civil servants at the end of their contracts?  Bit harsh.  Or maybe we should not use the term "ethnic-cleansing" so lightly.

        • Anonymous says:

          Ethnic cleansing does not always involve slaughter and it is an exaggeration to use the phrase in this instance.  It was done purposefully to make the point that many qualified, experienced expatriate workers were not having their contracts renewed in order to find places for less qualified, less experienced Caymanians.  Ifyou think the civil service is a mess now, wait a few months and you'll be looking back to the "good old days" when things were only halfway screwed up.  🙂

           

           

          • Anonymous says:

            "Ethnic cleansing" has no proper application in this context and was therefore an entirely inappropriate word to use. It is apt to create more heat than light. Wikipedia says that "ethnic cleansing" is a purposeful policy designed by one ethnic or religious group to remove by violent and terror-inspiring means the civilian population of another ethnic or religious group from certain geographic areas". No one is entitled to a job in the Cayman Islands Civil Service either Caymanian or expat but especially in an environemnt of high unemployment preference should be given to suitably qualified Caymanians. 

            • Anonymous says:

              That's a matter of opinion.  No.  No one is entitled.  But when the qualifications for applicants are significantly reduced simply in order to make more less qualified, less experienced Caymanians eligible, then the civil service and the people that rely on the civil service will suffer.

        • Anonymous says:

          What about the suffocating Caymanians?  Any hope there?

          • Sleepy says:

            Yawn. Getting a job here is like shooting fish in the barrel if you are Caymanian. Most of the moaners have no reakl world experience.

            • Anonymous says:

              You had better wake up. Only a non-Caymanian would make that comment. From hard experience Caymanians are well aware of the ads which are placed only to fulfil the letter of the law with absolutely no intention of hiring anyone (i.e. Caymanian) as a result. Of course they come up with excuses like you have to have "real world experience" meaning that we would like to employ an expat because he is from some place other than Cayman which must be the "real world".   

      • Anonymous says:

        And we all know that expats are entitled to be employed in the Cayman Islands Civil Service.

        • Anonymous says:

          Entitled?  No.  Jobs were advertised and applied for and persons hired.  So, it would seem, there are some qualifications involved.

          Have the needs of these jobs all changed?  Have the qualifications necessary to fulfill these jobs all changed?  How odd that only the jobs held by expatriate workers have changed to the point that the expatriate workers are no longer needed or desired.  How odd that those jobs are then being filled by Caymanians.

          It is a jobs program.  Let's acknowledge what is happening and why.

  13. Anonymous says:

    The UDP has a policy that changes to fit the occasion. Their mouthpieces tout their "business friendly" policy to garner as much money as they can from businesses by granting them as many permits as they want. As we get nearer to election time, they have to start playing their "protect Caymanians" policy so that they don't lose the uneducated votes who don't really understand anything…. but they still vote.

  14. Anon says:

    Oh yes indeed. Why make the process simple when you can complicate the hell out of it?

    People don't need clear, concise rule and regulations, they need an overly complicated process so that it can be massaged and manipulated by the politicians when it suits. The result is no one knows whether they stand a chance or not, and of course, a lack of clarity in the process leads to alack of confidence. This in turn leads to those expat workers not having the conviction to purchase real estate and seek to be part of the community.

    It seems to me Sherri, as the original architect of the key employee rules, does not understand the impact her rules have. Someone else needs to be looking at this, IMHO.

  15. truth says:

    Maybe if you make the question "simple"  then the answer will come easier.

    Question:  what do we have to do to make Caymanians able to compete in their own country for available jobs?

    So far the answer has been to make it so difficult and expensive to hire off island skill that business owners will have to hire Caymanians by default.  The results of this is businesses have had to close because it is too expensive to hire needed skill and too hard to find  the needed skill and work ethic on island.  Some businesses have stayed open by hireing from countries with good work ethics that will take a lesser wage.  Now that Caymans abuses of those people have been aired along with the inability to deal with them by Government that solution will also go away leaving business with no working solution. 

    So really.  Was this all really about keeping businesses open?  Perhaps the REAL question is how to keep anyone NOT caymanian from haveing a better life on Cayman than a Caymanian.  OK Now everything makes sense.  Its working.  No wonder that Caymanians are happy even though the country itself is heading for bankruptcy.

    It would be better for all involved if we all knew what Cayman really wants from others so all this confusion will go away. Its easier to understand that immigration is all about keeping Cayman for Caymanians(understandable) and not about keeping businesses running or workers available.  There!  Someone said it.

  16. Anonymous says:

    Simple is what is needed.  The exising mess is already too complicated and about to get even more complicated still with all these recent planned changes.  And Alden is right, far from making people feel more settled, the imminent changes and the suspension together, are just making everyone feel even more insecure and uncertain.  I can only sense more trouble and much more division within the communities to come when the planned changes take effect.

  17. noname says:

    My solution to the current Roll Over/PR problem (which Alden has copied verbatim) IS clearly the best solution for the country and its people. However it does require a total overhaul or the current process and approval board system. Clearly none of the current so called "experts" at immigration can be bothered with the extra work load on their watch so out comes the band aid solution and the 20000 problem becomes a 40000 (or whatever made up number you want) problem to be dealt with on someone else's watch. That government rug must be getting very close to the ceiling by now with everything being swept under it at the moment.

     

  18. squared says:

    Keep the rollover, just make it reasonable, say 40 days.Some will return, some won't. Why tear a loyal employees & good citizens life completely apart.

  19. Anonymous says:

    Ok then.  Make PR on the basis of adding value to the community.  Not solely on purchasing property.  But community work.  Have the charities vouch that they assist with them and put a requirement on how many hours and for how many years.  That way people don't just try to volunteer in the last year only trying to cram in the requirements.  So meals on wheels, the humane society, the red cross, big brothers/big sisters, the pines, hospice care.    Not just rotary and sunrise which is more of a social club, the people need to do real community work, not attend a few meetings and talk about it only doing something once in a while.  Of course have more points for the community work that is the least popular and is in dire need of volunteers. 

    Make this one of the requirements, not the only requirement.  People should be granted PR based on their desire to integrate into society.  Not solely on whether they have money  or not. 

    • Anonymous says:

      Their are those, who join the Clubs and stay long enough to achieve their objective andleave after they get PR or Status.  It is a matter of convenience.

      • Anonymous says:

        What do those Caymanians with free British Passports do to help the UK community?

        • Anonymous says:

          Hopefully nothing. Few of us actually live there. And we didn't ask for British Citizenship.

          • Anonymous says:

            But some take advantage of it.

          • Anonymous says:

            But many of you were sure quick to apply for British Passports and all the benefits that go with it.

          • Anonymous says:

            Well said. We were told this British Citizenship stuff was non-reciprocal. Had there been any other way it would have been bluntly refused.

        • Anonymous says:

          Excellent question.

           

        • Anonymous says:

          We did it already.  We saved royal blood and we are forever more rewarded by King George III from conscription or taxes for being so nice.  By the way, you're welcome!

          • Anonymous says:

            There was no royalty on the Convert, nor were Caymanians granted perpetual freedom from taxation for rescuing anyone.

            • Anonymous says:

              The thumbs down indicate  there must still be a local belief in that myth. 

          • Anonymous says:

            That's to your advantage.  You didn't answer the question.

      • Anonymous says:

        And there are those that fully integrate and help families within their communities almost daily, yet that doesn't score them any points at all unless they sign up to work for a registered charity as well.  A lady in our district spends much of her spare time keeping company with the elderly, teaching kids on the block to read and write better and teaching anyone who wants to, how to use a computer.  I really do think integration is more the significant key than charity work.

      • Anonymous says:

        And there are those who don't. Unless you know the actual percentages what's the point of your comment? 

      • Dick Shaughneary says:

        Maybe you should join an adult literacy club and discover the joys of correct comma use.

        • Crusty the Snowman says:

          Dick, thank you, for this, important, point about, commatis interruptus. Too often, the short, strokes of the, pen, are repeatedly, interrupted, until they just, stop

        • Anonymous says:

          What a pitiful existence you must have if your joy depends on correct comma use.

      • Harry B says:

        At least they are still making a contribution – where are the Caymanians?

      • Anonymous says:

        When an xenophobic Caymanian calls friend in Immigration and makes up stuff about expats applying for jobs and P.R., is that considered community service?  Perhaps Immigration should ask these complainers what they have done for Cayman? Other than make things less efficient, more corrupt, and provide a disservice to their country. Perhaps Immigration should create a Repeat Complainers List. I'm sure it is a loud, valueless, minority that is causing the majority of problems for businesses in Cayman. Just like its a minority of arrogant expats that truly think they are better than anyone else. If we could eliminate both extremes, we would have our wonderful community back.

    • Anonymous says:

      Performing community services is of course a commendable activity but perhaps those Caymanains should start contributing more of their time to their local citizenry as much as the "expat" community. It is too general a comment that all expats simply perform these functions to get residency or for that matter are required to do so to get residency. It is indeed tiring to see fewer and fewer Caymanians actually contribute to the overall social needs of the country. Perhaps their should be a statistic to see the percentage of expats who volunteer versus the local population. I do agree that many large companies on the Island seem to promote themselves as having altruistic motivations when in actuality it is nothing more than a smokescreen to make sure they are perceived as community spirited and willing to give back. If one were to look closely in many of these activites it is the staff/employees who actually have given their time and the organisation/owners simply take the credit   as if they it had been them that did the volunteering.

      Perhaps as a compromise partners and owners only in law firms, audit firms and other large financial services industries should be cleaning nd picking up garbage, assisting at the Pines and doing actualy physical community work. It is called leading by example.

      • MamaClare says:

        I concur with your comments. For too long Caymanians have slapped 'expats' in the face with their comments regarding the motives for community service, when these people are giving freely of their time. As an organisation that relies heavily on volunteers, I can tell you that over 75% of our volunteers are expats – and we do not judge them on motive, but are just thankful for their contribution. I hope that comments suggesting that their motives are less then honest does not dampen there efforts. If we had to soley rely on Caymanian volunteers we would have to cut our services by over 50%.

        • Anonymous says:

          Clearly there are many expats who make real contributions to our society, but there all also those who try to game the system by pretending to be contributing so as to gain permanent residency. There is no doubt about that. We have had people who join charities a year before their application and drop them as soon as they have obtained permanent residency. In one case one applicant claimed to be a regular blood donor upon investigation it was found that while he had signed up he had never actually given any blood. Obviously, it is important to determine whether purported contributions are real in order to distinguish between the desirables and the undesirables and not simply accept claims at face value. No one should object to that nor should to dampen the efforts of real contributors who should be happy to be distinguished from the counterfeit.     

    • Anonymous says:

      Not solely on purchasing property? Property counts for 20 points. In fact, one need not own property at all. One can invest in a local company and achieve the same thing. Your comment is a prime example of one not knowing the laws. This leads to much wasted time, on a topic that is critical to Cayman's success. We don't have time to waste.

       

       

       

  20. chris says:

    aldens idea is great. but lets set a target growth rate first. then let everyone apply and select the best assets for cayman.

  21. Anonymous says:

    ok so mrs bodden cowen was described as "the immigration expert and one of the architcts of the original policy,this is clearly an oxy moron.if shes an expert then she should know reducing the populaton is bad for the country and the economy.and if she was one of the architects of the rollover ———nuff said. XXXX

    one thing that everyone has missed in this whole post is this ,every  country in the world has an immigration policy,most have avenues where skilled people and needed people can get citeznship if they are the ones needed.not just if youve been here that long then here ya go,have ya status by the way what is it you do again,oh thats right your a gardener.this term limit should go and a rational immigration policy addopted to only accept the people who quiet frankley are going to help the island. 

  22. Jitterbug says:

    I mean how could immigration lawyers make their money if there was not a byzantine immigration law? 

    • Anonymous says:

      Surely you mean byzantine immigration law(S). I'm familiar with a case where husband and wife applied under the same law, but the Tribunal tried to apply different Immigration laws to each spouse.

      There is no such thing a trying a case using the law one applied under. Its a matter of which law the Tribunal wishes to apply to suit its case, whether that be for or against, the appellant. 

      The Boards and Tribunal seem to think favoritism and corruption are completely unrelated matters. This convenience is then compounded by incompetence and that, my friends, is how we get massive backlogs. All to the attorneys' delight.

       

       

       

       

       

  23. Anonymous says:

    Sherri is as much an Immigration Expert is as Weird Al Yankovic is a musician, singer and song writer.

    She may mean well, but the proof is in the pudding and this so called points system is a farce. Points are lost and found as needed depending on who is going to bat for theapplicant. Not one member of the Board can honestly deny this happens. 

     

     

    • Anonymous says:

      To Sherri's defense, guns don't kill people. Its the ignorant bastards that pull the trigger. If only the laws were applied the way they were intended, perhaps there wouldn't be so much confusion and corruption.

  24. Anonymous says:

    Perhaps its time the Immigration Laws were simple. Trying to make it complex has only led to confusion, abuse and corruption.  Indeed, when one thinks of Immigration the following words simply do not come to mind: "efficient", "just", "professional." It really  is time for less Boards and less chance of nepotism.

     

     

     

     

    • Anonymous says:

      Amen to that.

      Why not give in to reality and accept that all EU passport holders have the same automatic right to reside and work in the Cayman Islands without work permits or visas as a Caymanian on a British passport has to reside, work, claim welfare benefits, get free medical care, vote, etc. in the UK and all other EU countries.

      European Law states, 'Every citizen of the Union has the freedom to seek employment, to work, to exercise the right of establishment and to provide services in any Member State.' 

      That ensures the right of Caymanians on British passports to come over here so it's only a matter of time before someone decides it has to be a two-way street and the courts back them up.

      This is one of those simple moves that costs the Cayman Islands very little but could save $millions in the future.

       

      • Anonymouse says:

        Why would we want to do that. go and pay taxes, be treated like a person from the 3rd. world and it's cold out there. Not all of want or have a British Passport. I am certain you like 1 million EU immigrate here and take over. We can hardly make ends meet and have to compete on a daily basis for jobs to be told by a HR permit holder that actually this is for a permit renewal. yep you sure make a lot of sense. How about if you're not happy, put an add in the paper that your leaving and tell us where you worked so we can go apply before they hire another friend of a friend that need's a permit.

      • Anonymous says:

        Sorry, but courts won't back them up as long as the BOTA (British Overseas Territories Act 2002) says that while citizens of the Overseas Territories can now apply for full British citizenship (and therefore gain right of abode in the UK by virtue of being a British citizen), British citizens visiting Overseas Territories are SUBJECT TO LOCAL IMMIGRATION CONTROLS.

         

        The current poplulation clocks tell the whole story. 

        http://www.census.gov/population/www/popclockus.html

         

        With the current Caymanian population at around 60,000, the UK population around 62 million, the US over 312 million and the EU over 502 million, it is unreasonable to think that the Cayman Islands Government or the Caymanian people will agree to change existing laws to allow non-Caymanians, be they EU citizens or otherwise, the ability to work and reside here without work permits or visas.

         

        We only have 76 square miles in Grand Cayman, 100 total for the Cayman Islands…you think under your argument that small OT's could handle the influx of billions of people?  The law is correct to take into consideration the enormous disparity in populations between the EU, the US, the UK and the OT's, and this protection is precisely the reason behind the BOTA specifically incorporating the provision to leave local immigration controls in the hands of the local jurisdictions instead of mandating them in the UK's parliament.

        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Demographics_of_the_European_Union

  25. Anonymous says:

    Alden. It should not be just for the rich and famous but it is critically important that it not be for those who cannot pay their own way. We have imported too much poverty and have more than enough of our own. The allegations of ppm spending too much on schools already pales into insignificance when compared now to the ongoing cost caused by both ppm and udp of clothing, feeding, medicating, housing, educating and even policing far too many people who are not contributors (financial or otherwise) to our economy. Stop the political expediency and do what is right rather than what may be popular to the short sighted.

    • Anonymous says:

      I agree with you and at least if we had an excellent education system, with kids not just going to university but learning trades such as plumbers, electricians, mechanics, etc.etc.  then we have more kids leaving school who are actually employable.  No disrespect but some of junior staff (and they are mid to late twenties) have no concept of English grammar, can barely read, have trouble with numbering systems.  They graduated from high school but are barely literate.  Somthing is terribly wrong with the education system. 

  26. Anonymous says:

    There is also the inherent unfairness that rollover never applied to the civil service where certain Caymanian senior managers prefer to hire foreigners rather than their own Caymanians for the simple reason they can control them better and make them do whatever they want, whether it is in their job description or not. I work in the XXXXX and there is an expat woman in the ministry whose job could easily be done by a Caymanian but her boss is well known to prefer foreigners.

    • so Anonymous says:

      Sounds like her boss just is well known to prefer competent hard working over incompetent but doesn't know it.  But then again you just said the same thing in different words.  He is also probably know to get things done well and on time hence your problem with him.

  27. Anonymouse says:

    20,000 thousand now? where did this come from. All you are doing by suspending is like putting a band aid on a big cut. It would become a political Arena and a real mess for the next government and it aint going to be the same that WE are certain so think outside the box here.