Jamaican crime expert to lead prevention seminar

| 02/10/2013

(CNS): A crime fighter from Jamaica, William Shagoury, the custos rotulorum and chairman of the Clarendon Crime Prevention Committee, will be the keynote speaker on Thursday at a crime prevention seminar aimed at helping the community tackle and prevent the increasing crime on the island. Free and open to the public, the seminar will include a wide range of speakers and presentations on the latest crime fighting and crime prevention techniques. Shagoury will be talking about the role of the crime prevention committee in the national crime reduction strategy and other speakers will be examining the wider crime problem. Chief Inspector Angelique Howell, the driving force behind the event, said she was keen to see as many people as possible attend.

“Over the past three years Clarendon, Jamaica, has benefited from a consistent reduction in crime. Much of this can be attributed to the efforts of the Crime Prevention Committee led by Custos Shagoury. We are delighted that he has accepted our invitation to come to Cayman and share some of his experiences with us,” said Howell. “It promises to be a very worthwhile and informative seminar. We are grateful to our partners for working with us on the project and we are sure that everyone who attends will leave better informed and better prepared to play their part in reducing crime in Cayman.”

Taking place at the Westin Hotel on West Bay Road, it starts at 9:30am and is expected to conclude at2pm.

Category: Crime

Comments (36)

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  1. Anonymous says:

    Poor Cayman. Once a treasure of the world.

  2. Anonymous says:

    LOL…crime expert ha ha…coming from Jamaica, the largest crime in the Caribbean, if not world!

  3. "Full of Hope" says:

    Crime was and has always been here.  Ifthis beloved nation keeps blaming one nationality for all events taking place and not realizing that there's a hub of disaster waiting to happen right here on these beautiful shores.  What a rude awakening we're all in for. We must always be mindful to pluck the beam out of our own eyes, before taking it out of someone else's.

    There are numerous nationalities who inhabit these lands, and yet it's always the Jamaicans that are capable of committing crimes.

    I will agree that many have come here, with the intent of making a better life and have allowed themselves to be drafted into a life of crime.  Whether out of greed or otherwise and have caused a bad reputation for themselves & country

    We have to recognize that it's an "INDIVIDUAL" who has committed the crime and not a "NATION".  The same must be said about Caymanians/Cayman.  Based on all the negatiivity about Jamaicans it's just causing bias amongst individuals.  Be careful of the seeds we sow as what we sow we shall reap.

    • Anonymously says:

      No one is trying to say that Jamaicans are the people committing all the crimes this would be extremely ignorant to say but we must face the facts that Jamaicans do carry out or are involved with atleast 45 to 50% of the crimes that happen here.

    • Anonymous says:

      I thin if you look around the world you will find that Cayman is not the only place that finds that Jamaicans, more than most nationalities, are involved in many crimes. Ask the police in New York, London or Toronto. 

  4. Anonymous says:

    Maybe we can ask him to carry all Jamaica criminals we have inherited. We have our own and do not need to import and keep any from any other country or islands

    • Anonymous says:

      Ur comment is a classic example of why Caymanians should take the bashing/insults the ex-pats put on you with a grain of salt. Whether it's referring to Caymanians as illiterate, lazy, prejudice or unemployable. So quick to blame Jamaica for all your damn problems – a country that has it so much worse than Cayman. Who is gonna clean the muck out of your homes, teach your kids to read and write, build your homes, clean your yards and cook food for your men if all the Jamaican's were to leave? Don't even come at me with the garbage you Caymanian's do it yourselves. It's so funny how when Jamaican's do bad it's "those wutless Jamaican's yet when  Jamaican's do great things all of sudden it's "they repping for the caribbean". LMAO at you ppl.

    • Anonymous says:

      MacKeevas status grants to Jamaicans he was hoping would vote for him now ruining the country…Thanks Mac.

  5. Lee Kwan Too says:

    Instead of beating a path to a borderline failed state (Jamaica), why don’t we try getting advice from a success story (Singapore).

    Both went independent at the same time and with the same British colonial background and administrative/legal systems.

    One is a major success and the other is, well, Jamaica.

    We would do well to study Singapore, in particular in relation to our civil service model and performance.

    • Anonymous says:

      Asia.  Caribbean.  Different. See point?

    • Anonymous says:

      Mmmm..interesting.  However, you try telling those in the Carib that they cannot chew their mint gum in public?

  6. Disgusted! says:

    Seriously?  I have now officially lost all hope!

  7. Anonymous says:

     Awesome! We're aspiring to be more and more like Jamaica everyday.  That's the success model we should be striving for.  Their country is so well run and in such great shape, I guess that's why so many Jamaicans are so desperate to get out of there.  No offense to all the hardworking honest Jamaicans, but let's face it, the place is an absolute ces pool of crime.  Maybe it would be a better idea to get people in from somewhere where they actually catch criminals and solve crimes.  Unfortunately this is just more of the same message from the RCIPS: "We're incompetent, so it's up to you to try and stop crime.  You just need to do it without any weapons of any kind.  Good luck!"

  8. Anonymous says:

    Who pays for this visit?

    • Anonymous says:

      Stop the BS! do you want to cull the crime in Cayman or not ? does it matter who pays for it? We are already  paying for the security for the country.

  9. Anonymous says:

    Most of the crime that we have in Cayman was introduced by Jas. I am part Jamaican but the truth is the truth.

    • Anonymous says:

      Bigoted liar,19:46.

    • Anonymous says:

      Brilliant move. After all crime here was introduced by the Jcans so they should know how to irradicate it!

    • Anonymous says:

      I completely disagree, this is a new caribbean culture, not just from Jamaica. This started back in the 80's when music videos were introduced to us, then discrimination in US with music viedos and gangster rap. We stopped havig dinners together at the dinniing table. we allowed our kids to play violent video games. Oh dont forget the drug as well… apparently its cool. Dont blame a country blame youself if you are a parent.

      • Hoping for better days says:

        AMEN! You said it! I only wish you could have elaborated a bit more as to educate people better.

        You point about the media is spot on and parents allowed themselves and their children to be influenced by it.

         

        • Anonymous says:

          And so called 'professionals' like JLo and Miley Cyrus et al do not exactly give a good example to young girls!!!

      • Anonymous says:

        OF COURSE bad parenting plays a role but to say that the entire Caymanian community got swept up in the videos, music, games etc of the US is ridiculous!  Are you saying that because I started to listen to good ol American Country music back in the day that I'm now a cowboy?  Foolishness…..there are also tons of GREAT things about the US that would have been emulated too (think advancement of the arts, magnet schools for gifted children, community centers, etc etc) but I don't see that happening though to your reasoning I & my fellow countrymen are Americanized. 

        Kids having kids and raising kids who have kids…..the loss of community….the lack of forward thinking in the development of our country….the reliance on government thus turning us into a welfare state….  many of those elements can be seen as our downfall…. People need to be accountable, not given another reason why their failure is someone else's fault….

    • Anonymous says:

      Mine now, you don't want Mac chewing you up for talking bad about his people now!!!

  10. Anonymous says:

    I see they are following the tried and true Caymanian meeting formula of opening with a prayer and serving food. That brings the crowd in every time.

  11. Anonymous says:

    If we want to reduce crime, change the policy on prison and give those committing violent crime long prison sentences like 10, 15, or 20 years depending on what the crime is.  Those who steal must be sentenced to hand over what they have of value and work to pay every scrap of what they have stolen back.  Those who use drugs should be sentenced to counselling and those who sell drugs should be sentenced to 10 years in jail so they cannot influence the users who are generally weak personalities.  Bar operators who sell persons alcohol even after they are stone drunk contrary to law should be sentenced to shut down for three months.  The loss of income will teach them not to prey on the poor drunkards.

    Then we need to address the 3 to 10 year olds whose parents are known criminals, giving them the attention they need to learn values that will enable them to make something of themselves and live a crime free life.  If they have to be removed to a home where they receive the love and guidance they need then their criminal parents should be mandated by the court to undergo treatement and counselling and held to help pay for their children support.

    We have to take the bull by the horns and stop playing games with society.  Lawyers have their purpose, but many of them are part of the problem with some of these criminals.  It is no longer a game.  Society is at serious risk of disintergrating into chaos if we continue doing what we have done for the last 40 years.

  12. Anonymous says:

    The stats say crime up 68% in Clarendon. That was Sep 25, 2013 or just a week ago.

    http://www.insightcrime.org/news-briefs/jamaica-murder-spike-gang-related-police

    • Anonymously says:

      If what I am reading is true then we should really end the contracts with Jamaican police because they are need more in their country than here ( all good men should come to the aid of their country).  With this report about Jamaica, it makes Cayman's crime surge look like a tempest in a tea cup.  JDF for Cayman? hell no, you evidently cannot control your own who you share the same culture, then again maybe there are partnerships and trades going on with drugs  and guns forcash.  I truly feel sorry for many good people in Jamaica and must now wonder if the same is not about to happen here if we don't move fast to curb this criminal element that is rearing its ugly head in Cayman.

       

      • Anonymous says:

        All men come in aid of good money my friend.

      • Anonymous says:

        It’s the whimpy J’can cops who come here to work where it’s a cake walk in comparison to Jamaica, the roughians stay at home and duke it out! You take away the crime and raise the dollar and Jamaica would be a very nice place to live….Caymanian’s of course will not admit this.

         

        Signed,

         

        Caymanian (born n raised)

        • Anonymous says:

          Same fool who doesn't understand the use of apostrophes.

          • Anonymous says:

            Will u, peas' give me, a fwee inglish; lesson in propa use, of the "apusstrophy',spellin n gramma?!?!? you looks to be a berry smart fella?. tenk q, n i look fauwad to ur rypleye.

             

             

  13. Anonymous says:

    Someone needs to tell the Jamaica newspapers that crime is down in Clarendon.

    http://jamaica-gleaner.com/gleaner/20130501/lead/lead9.html

     

    • Anonymously says:

      Oh shy this is not true, Ms Howell is very thorough, she would known if crime was up in Clarendon and not down, stop making up stories.

  14. Anonymously says:

    Thank you Custos Willism Shagoury for your assistance in teaching us your crime preventation strategy.  I hear only good things about what you are doing to address and prevent crime in Clarendon expecially in May Pen where there is a great reduction in crime.  Thanks for your assistance.